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Louisville Recovery Time

So I don’t know about you guys but I sure do appreciate my recovery time. In fact, for me, the Holidays provide the perfect opportunity to recover big time.
And world-class recovery isn’t necessarily all about taking a Louisville Slugger to the alarm clock or going Kobayashi with chili-cheese whatever all day or letting the dishes stack up or wearing the same old Trojan National Championship FB jersey all week (Shucks, that would mean bruin fans could never recover properly and they need it more than most. Maybe in their case we could opt for “We held BYU to 59 points” tees.
In any case, research shows that in order to grow, we need to experience stress and recovery in fairly equal portions. Dr. Jim Loehr believes we most effectively develop physically and emotionally when our day-to-day routine consists of a series of stress/recovery intervals. Loehr is a world-renowned performance psychologist and CEO of Human Performance Institute in Orlando, Florida. Jim has worked with Fortune 100 executives, FBI hostage rescue teams, Pete Sampras, Dan Jansen and numerous other elite athletes…and me (twice.)
Compromising the recovery component of our oscillation through life can have some fairly dire consequences. Now that I think of it, I’m sending a copy of this column to spin instructor Pearl who doesn’t believe in recovery but is a UCLA grad and doesn’t follow football and that’s probably her recovery angle right there and there I go talking to myself…again.
Back to the troublesome health implications; there are many just within the scope of what we see in dentistry every day. When little kids suffer allergies, parents will often report some seriously loud nighttime teeth grinding. The grinding is the body’s adaptive effort to open up the ear canal and relieve congestion produced by big tonsils and adenoids that are part of a stressed immune system. If the allergies go untreated and recovery time is significantly impacted, the result can be altered oral and facial development as well as slowed growth. In the adult airway version, obstructive sleep apnea puts folks at risk for stroke and heart attack. We definitely need effective recovery time; without it, our quality of life and length of life can take a Louisville slugging.
And as long as I’m going Louisville, why shouldn’t I complain about baseball crimping my recovery time.
Like most American males my age (somewhere between 32 and 55.32) playing catch with my dad was my intro to sports. And at risk of my dad coming back and haunting Doc (wrath of) Kahn until he goes over my final Mock Board exam results just one more time, I’m here to say I’ve had it with baseball.
I’ve already gone from being a kid who played over-the-line everyday all summer and knew every Big League batting average to seeing the National Pastime as I do now. Today, attending a ballgame is a chance to eat junk food, wash it down with a cold, frosty beverage, read a book, BS, get some sun, defeat insomnia and seize 3-5 hours of recovery time. Simple as that.
And now, a billionaire billboard jockey won’t pay an extra $20 million over eight years to some punk in cleats because $160 million just isn’t enough for a 29 year-old guy who’s already set for life playing a kid’s game in front of a bunch of folks who’re wondering whatever happened to their 201Ks (I think I just threw up in my mouth.)
So, thanks for the memories. Shucks, now I’m probably gonna have to start watching ice hockey or…gulp…soccer. But I won’t be losing any sleep over baseball…zzzzzz.

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Posted by on December 29, 2008. Filed under Confessions of a Molar Jockey. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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